Monday, March 13, 2017

Ian Anderson (Jethro Tull)



Ian Scott Anderson, was born in 1947, in Dumfermline, the youngest of three siblings. The family lived in East Port, Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland, then later moved to Edinburgh. The young Anderson was always keen on music, initially influenced by his father's record collection of big bands and jazz musicians, then later by rock n roll. In 1959 the family relocated to Blackpool and Ian finished his schooling at Blackpool Grammar School. In 1962/63, he formed a school band called The Blades and they played soul and blues music, with Anderson on vocals and harmonica. The line-up was complete with Jeffrey Hammond (bass), John Evans (drums and piano), and another guitarist. Drummer Barrie Barlow became a member in 1963 after Evans had switched from drums to piano. Later the band developed into a seven piece called the John Evan Band (before becoming the John Evan Smash). Meantime Ian completed his studies in fine art at Blackpool College of Art. The group decided to try their luck in the South and moved to Luton. Frustrated by the lack of instant success most of the band quit, leaving Anderson and bassist Glenn Cornick (who had replaced Hammond) to join forces with blues guitarist Mick Abrahams and his friend, drummer Clive Bunker, both from the Luton-based band McGregor's Engine. They took a series of names as they played the London Club circuit but what was memorable about their various metamorphoses was Ian played mouth organ on stage standing on one leg. Frustrated by his own inability to master the electric guitar Ian traded it in for a flute and in record time became proficient in rock and blues flute. Eventually the band weas christened Jethro Tull by a booking agent’s clerk and the name stuck. The group signed to the Ellis-Wright agency and they released their first single in 1968 called "Sunshine Day.”



The record failed to impact on the record buying public. Their first album 'This Was ‘came out in the same year and caught some critical acclaim.



Blues purist Mick Abrahams left the band to form Blodwyn Pig after some artistic differences with Ian Anderson.



Martin Barre eventually replaced Abrahams and Jethro Tull released their next album Stand Up in 1969. It topped the UK album charts.



Progressive rock groups rarely issued singles as their demographic was young adults and not young teenagers who traditionally could not afford to buy albums. When Jethro Tull released “Living in the Past" as a single it reached number three in the UK charts.



They followed up with their other singles, "Sweet Dream" (1969) and "The Witch's Promise" (1970), and a five-track EP, Life Is a Long Song (1971), all of which made the top twenty.











By the time the album Benefit was released John Evan (keyboards) had joined the band.



In the same year Jeffrey Hammond re-joined the group when bassist Glenn Cornick was asked to leave. The group released their most popular album Aqualung in 1971 which had international success reaching Number 7 in the US album charts.



In 1972 the concept album Thick as a brick was released and topped the charts.



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